Articles > Cockatoos 101


18 May 2009

Cockatoos 101

                        by Madeleine Franco
 
If you’re considering a cockatoo as a pet, be warned:  They are not for everyone! There are many web sites you can visit, including www.mytoos.com, where you can listen to a soundtrack that will eliminate the excuse, “But, I had no idea they were so loud.” You’ll also get a no-holds-barred presentation on cockatoo ownership, undoubtedly designed to discourage all but the staunchest of “cockatoo people.” If that website doesn’t dissuade you—and it didn’t me—then, here are some things you’ll also want to know and remember. As the large cockatoos are by far the most mismanaged and therefore the most common birds in rescue and rehoming programs, it is important that people know what they are getting into when they decide they want to foster or adopt a cockatoo. To that end, here is a crash course, suitable for posting on your fridge. 
 
Cockatoos 101:   (1) They are loud;
                           (2) they are willful;
                           (3) they are dusty;
                           (4) they are destructive;
                           (5) they are demanding;
                           (6) they can be moody;
                           (7) they can be spiteful;
                           (8) they toss their food;
                           (9) they will bite if provoked;
                         (10) they're sometimes too smart for their own good; 
                         (11) they can be bullies; 
                         (12) they can sometimes develop bad habits, such as feather plucking and
                               screaming;            

                         BUT, perhaps worst of all,

                         (13) they steal! (your heart)

            Don’t say we didn’t warn you! 
                                                                             _____________
 

Copyright © 2006 Madeleine Franco, all rights reserved. Madeleine Franco, who has had her heart stolen at least a dozen times by cockatoos who continue to make it almost easy to overlook items 1 through 12, is an award-winning busness writer/presenter and founding president of the Southern Nevada Parrot Education, Rescue & Rehoming Society (SNPERRS). As an avicultural hobbyist, she tends a flock of approximately 30 non-breeding, highly platonic and interactive pet parrots. Madeleine is the owner/operator of Premium Pine Cones, LLC (www.premiumpinecones.net), specializing in remedies, toys and diversions for parrots that pluck but would like to kick the habit

Madeleine Franco